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WHO Classification of Tumours
Lipomatosis
Connective, subcutaneous and other soft tissues


Definition

Lipomatosis is a diffuse accumulation of mature adipose tissue that may occur in various regions of the body
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Fletcher CDM, Unni KK, Mertens F (Eds.)
World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone.
3rd Edition
IARC Press: Lyon 2002



. Several subtypes are distinguished:

> Diffuse lipomatosis arises in trunk, extremities, head and neck, abdomen, pelvis or intestinal tract and may be associated with macrodactyly or gigantism of a digit. It most frequently affects children <2 years of age

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Greiss ME, Williams DH (1991)
Macrodystrophia lipomatosis in the foot. A case report and review of the literature.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 110: 220-1




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McCarthy DM, Dorr CA, Mackintosh CE (1969)
Unilateral localised gigantism of the extremities with lipomatosis, arthropathy and psoriasis.
J Bone Joint Surg Br 51: 348-53



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> Symmetric lipomatosis is characterized by a symmetric deposition of fat in the upper part of the body, particularly the neck. It occurs in middle aged men of Mediterranean origin and is often associcated with liver disease or excessive alcohol consumption.

> Pelvic lipomatosis arises in the perivesical and perirectal areas. This lesion most frequently affects black males from 9 to 80 years of age

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Heyns CF (1991)
Pelvic lipomatosis: a review of its diagnosis and management.
J Urol 146: 267-73



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> Steroid lipomatosis affects the face, sternal region or the upper middle back (buffalo hump). It occurs in patients on hormonal therapy or with increased endogenous production of adrenocortical steroids.

> HIV-lipodystrophy is characterized by the accumulation of visceral fat, breast adiposity, cervical fat pads, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance as well as fat wasting in the face and limbs. AIDS patients treated with protease inhibitors frequently develop HIV-lipodystrophy, but it also occurs in patients receiving other forms of antiretroviral therapy

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Boufassa F, Dulioust A, Lascaux AS, Meyer L, Boué F, Delfraissy JF, Sobel A, Goujard C (2001)
Lipodystrophy in 685 HIV-1-treated patients: influence of antiretroviral treatment and immunovirological response.
HIV Clin Trials 2: 339-45




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Kravcik S (2004)
Update on HIV lipodystrophy.
HIV Clin Trials 5: 152-67





Patients generally present with massive accumulation of fat in the affected areas. The lesions consist of poorly circumscribed aggregates of soft yellow fat and are composed of lobules and sheets of mature adipocytes that may infiltrate neighbouring tissues. All forms of lipomatoses tend to recur locally after surgery. The treatment is palliative surgical removal of excess fat

Click for details
Fletcher CDM, Unni KK, Mertens F (Eds.)
World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone.
3rd Edition
IARC Press: Lyon 2002



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