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WHO Classification of Tumours
Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma)
Small intestine


Definition

Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) comprises up to 8% of B-cell lymphomas and manifests predominantly in the stomach, less frequently in lung, skin, and ocular adnexa. It arises from the marginal zone of lymphoid tissues and is histologically characterized by small to medium sized morphologicall heterogeneous atypical lymphocytes.
In many cases of MALT lymphoma, there is a history of a chronic inflammatory disorder that results in accumulation of extra nodal lymphoid tissue. Risk factors include infectious organisms, e.g. H. pylori (gastric MALT lymphoma), Chlamydia psittaci (ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma) Campylobacter jejuni (IPSID) and Borrelia Burgdoferi (cutaneous MALT lymphoma) and autoimmune diseases.
Adults are predominantly affected. MALT lymphomas respond to radiotherapy and the clinical course is ususally favourable.

Other types of marginal zone lymphoma include:
Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) and
Splenic B-cell marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL)